LIKE US ON FACEBOOK

An Ex-Dictator Is Suing Activision for Making Him the Bad Guy in ‘Call of Duty’

1 year ago
TAKE ACTION
Photos: Wikimedia Commons/Activision Blizzard

Photos: Wikimedia Commons/Activision Blizzard

Manuel Noriega was a bad, bad man.

Between the drug ties, corruption, money laundering and murder, the American-trained CIA product-turned-dictator earned himself a United States invasion of Panama and subsequent ouster after refusing to hand over power to his democratically elected opponent in 1989.

His capture is remembered for the hilariously unusual tactics Army forces used to coax him out of the Catholic building he was hiding in, which involved blaring rock ‘n’ roll until he surrendered.

It was only fitting, then, that gaming studio Activision Blizzard reprised his role as a traitorous Panamanian dictator in “Call of Duty: Black Ops II.” You can see in the unflattering cameo below:

Noriega, who’s been playing musical jail cells as he serves out sentences in the US, France, and Panama, filed suit against Activision Blizzard Inc. in Los Angeles County Superior Court on Tuesday.

noriega-call-of-duty

Apparently, he wasn’t thrilled about his portrayal as “a kidnapper, murderer and enemy of the state.” Was he expecting to be memorialized holding a teddy bear?

The ex-dictator is seeking damages, as well as lost profits for his appearance in the video game that netted $1 billion just two weeks after its release in November 2012.

A group of NCAA athletes just settled a similar case with Electronic Arts for $40 million. Lindsey Lohan also recently filed suit against Rockstar Games for using a character modeled after her in “Grand Theft Auto V.”

Even though he might be in for a payday, at 80 years old with another 18 left on his Panamanian prison term, it’s unlikely that he’ll even live to see a dime of that money as a free man.

Whether he’s looking out for relatives or just trying to prove a point, that this deposed tyrant may actually have a case is almost funny enough to forget for a moment the terror that he was.

 

 

-- display nothing --