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PHOTOS: This Groundbreaking 3D Printer Built 10 Homes in 24 Hours

3 months ago

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3D printer home

From Oreos to body parts, 3D printers have been cranking out some pretty unbelievable stuff lately.

But in Shanghai, WinSun Decoration Design Engineering Co. has been using a monstrous printing device to build homes at a breakneck pace — 10 homes in 24 hours.

Measuring out at roughly 105 feet long, 33 feet wide, and 21 feet tall, this clearly isn’t your average retail printer.

3D printed house 1
Screen Shot 2014-04-14 at 12.08.34 PM

Unlike most 3D printers, this printing giant is fed with cement rather than plastic, making it especially well-suited for home construction.

The best part is the houses are super cheap to make and they’re made almost entirely of construction and other industrial waste.

3D printed house 7

When it’s all said and done, the houses are roughly 650 square feet and cost only $4,800 to make, which is why they’re being considered as a housing solution for China’s poor.

It’s not the first crack at 3D home building, but it is definitely the fastest, most economical, and environmentally friendly way we’ve seen to date.

Check out the finished product below:

3D printed house 4
3D printed house 6
3D printed house 2

 

RYOT NOTE from Ben

 It’s pretty great that this design firm has found an affordable and eco-friendly housing solution for the poor, which is why they should team up with Architecture for Humanity. They’re a great charitable organization looking for architectural solutions for humanitarian crises and communities in need.  Click the action box above this story to learn more, share this story and Become the News!

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17 comments
jamaalrashid
jamaalrashid

People that seem to have reservations about this idea are probably construction workers.

.. Don't worry this wouldn't reach this side of the world anytime soon. Ur jobs are fine ;p

JDJ333
JDJ333

#creative solution for the #poor.

JaykQuinn
JaykQuinn

4800 for the structure is cheap, however 75% of a home or buildings cost come in ME&P, which is mechanical, electrical and plumbing. Still puts the house a great cost advantage, but by no means, be under the impression that the total cost is any where around $5K


SteveHarvey2
SteveHarvey2

I wonder if it has steel reinforcement to prevent cracks. I think it would be interesting to make the 3D printer easily movable where you could set it up and print an entire house bottom up.

GuidoHabets
GuidoHabets

fantastic! but it is still far away from aesthetics . wouldn't put it on my list for architectural beauty

GiorgioMartini
GiorgioMartini

coo, how about using hempocrete or other better materials that last longer and are stronegr...


NickSitterly
NickSitterly

Um, not the first concrete home idea. Has always been scrapped in the past due to inevitable cracking and collapse after settling, weather, shifting. Think Sidewalks.

Snowbringer
Snowbringer

@JaykQuinn  With this technology you could print the DWV piping, HVAC ductwork, and electrical raceways as an integral part of the structure.

That should cut those costs quite a bit.

RichardMagnano
RichardMagnano

@GiorgioMartini  The biggest asset to using hemp in concrete is that it increases the thermal properties. 

Longer / Stronger aren't part of it's benefits. That is a misconception. 

JaykQuinn
JaykQuinn

@NickSitterly  They have building tilt wall concrete for 100 years in warehousing, I am not sure what you are talking about? Concrete block or tilt wall is the most expensive way to build and is just about the best quality you can use, which is why they have a 50 year depreciation vs a metal building at 35 years. 

RichardMagnano
RichardMagnano

@NickSitterly I'm not sure what agenda you're behind, but your statement is false.  Sidewalks crack due to shifting in the ground and environmental changes such as the freezing and expansion of water. As long as these houses are put on a foundation, they're no different than a building made from cinder block and a LOT more durable than the trailers or the wood homes we currently build all over. Not only that, but faster to build as well. 


yardape6
yardape6

@Snowbringer @JaykQuinn  That is a terrible idea.  For one, if you want to make changes/fix problems, you now have to tear apart a much larger section of your house.  Two, you have lots of regulations that dictate specifications, trying to engineer that into the printing process is not worth the investment.  You still have all of the fixtures to purchase, so you aren't saving much, but you are making the design much more complicated.


GiorgioMartini
GiorgioMartini

ive read its stronger, lasts longer and its more ecofriendly.... so thats not true ?

JaykQuinn
JaykQuinn

@yardape6 @Snowbringer @JaykQuinn  This application is more for quick housing for the poor, this type of housing is used in the manufacturing communities in places like china and mexico. I am not the biggest fan of this yet, but it offers a very good solution to the housing problems in manufacturing areas that don't have the proper infrastructure for a work force. I work in industrial real estate and I have personally seen the thousands of 400 sf homes, that support the manufacturing facilities. 


Programming for specifications would be a very easy thing to do, the load factor would need to be established and meet code and they would be able to poor. 


With regard to the cost I did say that 75% of the cost comes in the ME&P. The outlying structure made of concrete isn't a problem, but the interior of the home, however, this type of construction is for the lower end, making small homes for the poor. This application will be used by governments of private manufactures. The current 450 sf homes in Mexico sell for $20,000, this could lower that cost

theultimateg303
theultimateg303

@RichardMagnano @GiorgioMartini  The real impact on the environment comes from the CO2 emmisions in making concrete. Hempcrete drastcally reduces that CO2 footprint. Also, hempcrete petrifies over time making it just as strong as concrete with better thermal properties than concrete. Provide data to the contrary....

RichardMagnano
RichardMagnano

@GiorgioMartini  Correct, it's not true. It has benefits over traditional concrete, but it's not some kind of miracle material as many of the pro-hemp sites have been pushing. 

If you start to consider that concrete is the most manufactured substance on the planet, then try to add in the agricultural needs for supporting hemp worldwide, or even in a project such as this, the ecological impact becomes a bit greater. 


PHOTOS: This Groundbreaking 3D Printer Built 10 Homes in 24 Hours

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